Essay On Working Mothers Are Better Mothers

Essay On Working Mothers Are Better Mothers-51
There are signs that this "second shift" pattern may be changing. The study found that fathers who provided child care were more likely to be employed in lower-income occupations; more likely to work in service occupations (police, firefighting, maintenance, security); more likely to be military veterans; and more likely to live in the Northeast than in other parts of the United States.

There are signs that this "second shift" pattern may be changing. The study found that fathers who provided child care were more likely to be employed in lower-income occupations; more likely to work in service occupations (police, firefighting, maintenance, security); more likely to be military veterans; and more likely to live in the Northeast than in other parts of the United States.More than 8 million school-age and 15 million pre-school-age children in the United States are placed in the charge of substitute care givers during the hours their mothers are working.

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In 2004, Working Mother magazine reported that 97 percent of the companies on their list of the 100 best companies for mothers in the workforce offered compressed workweeks or job sharing opportunities.

Mothers who work part-time gain more flexibility and more time with their children, as well as time to devote to their own needs.

With growing numbers of women confronting the competing pressures of work and home life, observers predicted that these women's needs would be accommodated by significant changes in how things were managed on both fronts: a domestic revolution in sex roles at home and a major shift toward enlightened attitudes and policies toward women in the workplace.

Although there have been some changes, they have not been substantial enough to prevent many working mothers from feeling that the price for "having it all" is too high.

According to one study, the number of companies offering some type of employment flexibility to their workers rose from 51 percent in 1990 to 73 percent in 1995.

Fifty-five percent offered flex-time, while 51 percent offered part-time work.The percentage of child care provided by day care centers had increased from 6 percent in 1965 to 28 percent in 1990, partly because the influx of women into the workforce had narrowed the pool of female relatives and friends available to take care of other people's children.Between 19, employment by day care centers increased over 250 percent, representing a gain of almost 400,000 new jobs.In the early twenty-first century, some working mothers express disenchantment with the "Supermom" ideal and look for alternatives to help them create a better balance between work and family .It is important to recognize that mothers in the U. workforce are not a homogeneous group of people; there is no typical working mother.Workplace child care facilities did not grow at the same rate: a 1995 survey found that only 10 percent of the nation's 681 major employers offered on-site care programs to their employees.There are also a number of options for part-time child care as of the early 2000s: Given the failure of either home or workplace demands to ease significantly, working mothers routinely sacrifice time for themselves, and many report high levels of stress, anxiety , and fatigue.Some women feel too threatened by the repercussions of time off the job to even take a maternity leave; others report problems on reentering the workforce after such a leave.Women in highly competitive professions are especially reluctant to lighten their work loads or schedules for fear that such measures will signal a lower level of commitment or ability than that of their peers, and they will be automatically assigned to the infamous "Mommy track." Many women—both with and without children—in traditionally male professions still earn lower salaries and carry greater workloads than those of male colleagues with comparable credentials and work experience because of the perception that they are not the breadwinners in their families.In 1990 a survey of 5,000 couples found that only 50 percent of husbands took out the garbage, 38 percent did laundry, and 14 percent ironed.Working mothers also received less help from their children, with one important exception—working single mothers, whose children helped out at home twice as much as children in other families.

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